Dog Agility Training Without Equipment
Agility Training

Dog Agility Training Without Equipment

  • October 12, 2021

Dog agility is one of the fastest-growing canine sports in the United States because it’s exciting, challenging, and a whole lot of fun.Of course, agility classes are a great place to get started in the sport.Remember to use lots of encouragement and praise when your dog is successful.Teach Tricks.This is handy when teaching him to enter the contact zones at the end of an agility obstacle.Back Up teaches your dog basic body awareness because he must pay attention to what all four paws are doing.Finally, teaching your dog to jump through a hoop is a great introduction to the tire jump.According to Spooner, tricks that increase a dog’s flexibility are great for agility training.That includes sending a dog out in front, moving him from one side to the other, or having him work at a distance.Start by teaching your dog to work comfortably on either side of you.A treat in the hand on the side you want is a great motivator for most dogs!”.Start by rewarding any approach to the object and work your way up to having your dog walk around and return to you.But with obstacles like the dog walk, your dog needs to be aware of exactly where he’s placing each paw.There are lots of ways to help your dog increase his body awareness.You can even make a line of boxes and teach him to crawl or step through them.Build Confidence With Moving Objects.Reward your dog for any interest in the board, then encourage him to put a paw on top.Drape the blanket over the spaced-out chairs and teach your dog it’s fun to walk through to the other side.Jumping is a critical agility skill and an easy one to practice at home.As Spooner says, “What a dog can jump and what they should jump are two different things.The weave poles are probably the most challenging obstacle to teach, and there are many different training approaches, so you’ll likely need expert guidance to help your dog master this skill.Space the poles 24 inches apart and always ensure your dog enters between the first and second poles in the row from his left side.The Agility Course Test (ACT) is an entry-level agility event designed to introduce and welcome beginning dogs and their handlers to the AKC sport of agility.You can continue your training by attending agility classes at a nearby AKC Training Club or a local training facility where your dog can practice on actual agility obstacles. .

Training without Equipment

Pre-Agility Training A Game of Praise & Fun.Over the years, Maxine Bray has known a lot of people who own young dogs they eventually wanted to train for competition but who have small gardens or no agility equipment of their own or access to it.Before owning any of my own agility equipment, I devised many exercises using little or no equipment, and from five weeks old when I normally get my pups, I start pre-agility training using 'agility words.'.Playing with the pup on the lead while agility is being trained by others begins the bond between handler and dog.With all this pre-agility training, the play and praise is important every time a small exercise is complete correctly.Don't 'tell the dog off.'.Encourage it to walk ahead of you by saying 'go on,' move left or right, giving a little tug on the lead and the direction command.Contact training.I don't like my pups climbing up and down the back door step, so I made a small ramp which is sanded and painted like contact equipment.I teach the pup to walk up and down it, always saying 'walk on' or what ever words you would use for contact equipment.Then moving off from the top of the stairs, the person commands 'go on' while the person at the bottom catches the dog before it alights, commanding 'creep' and gently putting the dog into a down at the bottom of the stairs.Using a dogwalk or builders' plank on the floor, put your dog on its lead and teach it to walk across.Once confident, hesitate at the end each time, praise and walk off.This is built up over time to running off lead time hesitating and praising.This will help get the 'up' contact and so stops any problems before it begins.Place two jump wings (no pole) and sit the dog.Even with very young dogs, you can roll a ball along the floor and encourage the pup to 'go on,' so they begin to learn to work away.This way there is less likelihood of 'pulls' or injuries, Again I start the dog as early as possible, sitting on the floor, playing and saying up and holding the pup each time it naturally jumps onto my knee.Learn your 'natural working distance' between your dog and yourself.If you recognise the natural working distance, it can help you on an agility course, and if you can't run then it's important to position yourself on the course to help you dog as much as possible.She was determined that Pixie would do all the same things as the other dogs in the household which were GSD and Border Collies.Pixie was a clown - always making you laugh - but she had a good working brain, and was at home herding sheep or going out shooting with the 'big' dogs.Maxine trained her first gun dog at the age of 12, her first sheep/herding dog at the age of 14.Along with three other people, she started an 'Obedience for Agility Club'; then finally an agility club.Over the last 25 years 'in dogs' (I started early!Any ideas out there that would be a good start on a future agility dog?That is a great idea to make mini obstacles for the pups!You can start out with ground poles that they can walk over and then raise them a little higher using crushed pop cans on the ends.It would also be fun to try the puppies on a mini ramp by using a board braced on one end on a box or pillow and other end on the floor making a slight incline.I really like the 'adult show the pup' method of introduction to agility obstacles for ages eight months or so on up.It takes months to get them to weave with the same ease that I get on a pup following a trained adult.And very much depending on how I pre-conditioned the puppy, I let pup run over the equipment or not.I have just started baby agility training at age five months.She's been walking on planks, running thru/sending to tunnels from the beginning.I can send her to tunnels from a good distance.No problem, just no reward.Went to the seesaw, which I had set so the pivot was approz 8 inches above the ground.The second time she ran and jumped off before the pivot.Third time she ran up, I clicked at the pivot, and rewarded the performance.I really feel that I need to teach speed from the absolute beginning, and my prior micromanagement of 'easy, wait, easy, careful' just hindered Marley's performance.Though she is fearless now, she still has some fear periods to go through, and if something happened like a fall off the DW or a teeter scare, it could be years before you get her back on and you may never have the performance you want (like you describe with your other dog, Marley).Now that you know she has great potential, I would give her several months to grow up a little, before going any further on the equipment.What are we doing on equipment at five months anyway?Why not just let the puppies enjoy the noise, dogs, people and a tunnel or two?Walk on a leash, get used to walking on both sides of their handler etc.At what age do you start agility training - 12 months as suggested by the Kennel Club or earlier? .

Dog Agility Training

Dog Agility Training

Dog Agility Training

Your dog will learn the obstacles each class and then we will complete short sequences to run through. .

Beyond Dog Agility Equipment: Other Skills A Dog Needs

Beyond Dog Agility Equipment: Other Skills A Dog Needs

Beyond Dog Agility Equipment: Other Skills A Dog Needs

While it might seem like mastering agility equipment is the most important skill your dog can possess, socialization actually is just as crucial.The people who attend these events typically are very good with dogs and respectful, so it’s not as if there will be a bunch of tail pullers at the event, but with so much activity and chaos, an easily stressed and poorly socialized dog will have a tough time managing their behavior.The pause table and the start line are two great places to teach a dog to sit and stay, as they must exhibit these skills during completion as well.Obviously, you should discuss your dog’s health with his or her veterinarian prior to beginning agility or any exercise program.In addition, helping your dog use agility equipment and conditioning exercises will have a positive impact on your health as well.The mini agility equipment is ideal for puppies, small dogs and even rainy day indoor training. .

A Beginner's Guide to Dog Agility – 3 Lost Dogs

A Beginner's Guide to Dog Agility – 3 Lost Dogs

A Beginner's Guide to Dog Agility – 3 Lost Dogs

“I think if every dog owner engaged in agility training with his or her dog, the dog world would be a better place.Then agility might be right for you!Agility training is all about building a common language between dog and owner.Another benefit of agility is that it provides the kind of exercise that actually improves a dog’s behavior.Have you ever taken your dog for a long run, only to bring him home and find that he’s actually more hyper and crazy than when you started?Bonus: The skills you learn in agility class will make you a better dog owner or trainer overall.Now what exactly IS agility?It’s a timed obstacle course for a team that consists of a handler and a dog.A course usually has 12-18 obstacles, like tunnels, jumps, tire jumps, weave poles, and the big “ramp” obstacles collectively known as the contacts.In a trial (aka competition or show), the dog runs the course off-leash and the handler can’t touch the dog.The ones you’ll hear about most often in the US are NADAC, AKC, and the USDAA (see below for a more complete list of national and international groups).This sport is open to people of all ages and athletic ability.At any given trial you’ll find junior handlers, veteran handlers, and everything in between.Most sanctioning organizations allow mixed breeds to compete.When I was training competitively, the time commitment per dog was this:.1 one-hour class per week, about six months out of the year.Agility trials are usually weekend-long events put on by local clubs, who play by the rules of their preferred organization.Each trial consists of a few different courses, or runs.If you’ve ever been to an agility trial and seen a group of people walking around in the ring with one arm out and muttering commands to an invisible dog, you’ve just witnessed the walkthrough portion of the trial.The first team is called to the starting line.The dog failing to complete the next obstacle (this is called a runout or refusal).If a dog has a clean run without any faults, it’s called a qualifying run or a “Q,” and they’ll get points added to their official record.However, the Qs are important – with enough points, your dog will earn a title.As you earn each title you stick it to the end of your dog’s name, so Fido’s name can eventually start to look like Jonas’s.If you want to take classes, watch an agility trial, or just find local people who can introduce you to the sport, finding a training club is your best bet.United States Dog Agility Association – This is a good organization to start with.North American Dog Agility Council – My dogs are registered with NADAC.This is a good way to check out a club before you take classes.), making some of your own equipment and training your dog on your own can be a lot of fun.Important: Avoid letting your puppy or teenage dog jump over any obstacles.Check with your vet before you start agility training.Just for Fun Agility – More ideas for homemade obstacles.Introduction to Dog Agility – This book was my agility bible for years.Youtube: a self-taught learner’s goldmine.Pamelamarxsen’s agility videos playlist – Videos of agility training as well as other training how-to’s that will help with agility.You can play this game as a casual way to have fun with your dog or push yourself and your canine athlete to see just how far you can go. .

Northville dog park gets agility training equipment thanks to Eagle

Northville dog park gets agility training equipment thanks to Eagle

Northville dog park gets agility training equipment thanks to Eagle

He said he took his dog to an AKC agility training class, which was the inspiration for his Eagle Scout project.His project consisted of six pieces of equipment for agility training: Weaving polls, a pause box, a tunnel, two adjustable jumps and a tire jump. .

Episode 270: Winter Training

Episode 270: Winter Training

Episode 270: Winter Training

People are putting away equipment, and people are wondering what kind of agility training they can or should be doing during this time.- Yeah, and I think here, you wanna be looking at what do you have access to at home?Maybe you don't even normally attend class, but maybe during the winter months, you might wanna enroll in a class if that's available in your area, but just, you know, where are you going to get access to the equipment for agility?- So here in Ohio, we have a lot of our competitions and our training classes inside, but.- Yeah, it is our prime time for training because- - It's the summer where we can't get a lot of work done because it's simply too hot - Exactly.dogs and for the people as well.So if you have a dog who's been competing for a couple of years, you can think of this as kind of a break, and I think this is a natural break that a lotta people use.Jennifer, when you look at big competitions, they seem to be mostly in the fall, mostly in the spring, and not too many in the dead of winter, kinda January, at least here.- It's interesting looking at the timing of big events because this is something I've talked about with several other people because AKC Nationals being right at the very end of winter, right, so late March.It's naturally when I let my dogs have a little bit of a break, and then.Ethan's outta school, so my schedule and ability to train is a little bit more limited, and then kinda mid-January picking back up.I don't wanna take all of January, part of February off and then try to be ready in March for them to be in their prime, so the scheduling and that.Even though I do have access to a indoor training, I do tend to adjust my training a bit this time of year, but the seasoned.dogs, the older dogs, I do tend to use this time to work more on their conditioning: keeping them in shape, getting them in shape, muscle tone, you know, even looking at jumping, where the young dogs are learning how to jump and how to do the mechanics of what they need to.And I kinda look at three big, big areas, and actually, they're all very much related because they don't depend on equipment or lots of space for, like, actual running, and so the three areas are start lines, tables, and your end.require as much space because you don't have necessarily a lot of motion coming into those things, and so those are things that you can work on.- Yeah, and I think that a lot of people, when they think of agility, they think about running agility, and they think about handling, and it is probably the most fun part of agility is handling and running with your dog, but I.It is the perfect time to go and work on these behaviors that you need that are important that maybe aren't as fun for you, but, you know, we can work on making those.at the start line, that they're gonna hit their contacts, right, and now's a good time to make sure that you're prepared, but if you've got the veteran, and their behaviors kinda fell off a little bit there in the fall, and they were missing some contacts, and their start lines were getting a little pushy, this is a great time to invest in some retraining so when you come back.We can kinda take several of these related concepts, throw 'em all in one bucket, and say, "Getting my dog ready to perform in the trial environment," and so when we talk about veterans, I think you're gonna be talking about dogs.Let's say that you have a dog.They've been doing agility for a couple of years, but they are much better at home than they are at trials, right, so this is a nice opportunity for you to work on and focus on some of these things.This is something that you don't know how your dog.Pick a day, several hours that you can go and invest, take your dog over there, and get them in that environment, being outside of the trial site, having other dogs around in the distance, being in a place where there are going to be other competitors, and so this.What are some other things dogs do?Sits, downs, spins, these simple behaviors, you wanna make sure that your.So if you spend winter break, and you wanna invest in a little bit of dog training, I would try and take my dog to different places.make sure that you're limiting your risk, right, that you're out there with a mask, that you're staying away from other people, but you don't need people coming up and petting your dog or standing right next to you or anything like that.that's a good opportunity to work on some things and help prepare them for the environment and trials a little bit better.order to create kind of that stimulation and that excitement of other dogs running around, people moving around, I have gone down there and just worked some of my attention and a little bit of focus there, so not using it to go in and run my dogs, but using that as a practice for those types of things because something like a Home Depot or a Lowe's, once you start.The next thing that people should think about, or might think about, is working on your verbal cues, and so I think this depends a little bit on access to equipment.to my students on verbals, but verbals and verbals against motion, and I'm not even talking agility verbals at this point, but having your dog be able to respond to a verbal when the motion doesn't support it.Stuff like sit, down, and stand, I mean, those verbals also come into play in my conditioning, right, being able to get the dog to do a kick back stand from a sit or be able to do those behaviors on a FITbone, so it's.so if you can't walk through your living room and ask your dog to spin left without a change in motion, it's going to be difficult when you're running down a line of jumps, going into a 15-foot U-shaped tunnel discrimination, where your motion is equally supporting the left end and the right end, and you need your dog to come in and do the threadle entry.- Yeah, I think that's really great, and I think that the thing that people need to keep in mind is that people tend to want to kind of jump into the agility application, but if your dog can't do something, you.gonna be able to do 'em in front of agility equipment, so kinda going back to what you said, these things that we can train, start lines, you know, verbals, they all kinda actually kinda tie together, so can you work on over the next several months being able to ask for these behaviors, not just right in front of your dog, but 20 feet away so that then, when you.get back out in agility, you can do a lead-out, and, you know, once you get out there jump and a half away, ask for one of those behaviors, so it kind of all comes full circle on the verbals also tying in directly with start lines.There have been some winters where, you know, I've taken a complete break from training, even up to four to six weeks, you know, but usually, I'll get at least, at least two weeks off during the winter, typically around Christmas to New Year's.dog, it's okay.You're gonna just delay a training or a debut by a few weeks, and for your veteran, they can probably use the mid-year break.I think it's perfectly okay to have two downtimes during the year, during the calendar year, after all your spring events, during the summer, and then, you know, again, during the winter, I think that's fine.not training, and this is something people do in all sports at this time of year.You wanna think about your dog, what your dog needs.It's a great time to do that.those are things that are gonna be very, very helpful when they get to the trial setting, especially for dogs that have not yet debuted.You also wanna work on verbals.Plan for the next year if you're gonna be taking that break, or even if you're not taking a break, it's a good time to do that, but there are mental game-type things that you can be working on during the winter.Winter's a great time if you have any procedures for the dogs.- I have a spay and a dental scheduled on the week between Christmas and New Year's because it is a good downtime with the holiday and events,.All right, perfect, that is a great last point, and that is it for this week's podcast. .

At what age should you start agility training? Can puppies do agility?

At what age should you start agility training? Can puppies do agility?

At what age should you start agility training? Can puppies do agility?

Let’s look at the deciding factors when it comes to starting agility training with your dog. .

How to DIY Obedience Train Your Dog

How to DIY Obedience Train Your Dog

How to DIY Obedience Train Your Dog

However, plenty of people successfully train their dogs on their own.Before you begin dog obedience training, choose the best method for you and your dog.Start by teaching basic commands.At the same time, work on teaching your dog to stay.Once your dog has mastered these dog obedience basics, you can move on to fun tricks and advanced commands.You can find a professional dog trainer who offers private training sessions, and some trainers even offer online sessions.Many dog owners prefer to join a local dog obedience class so they will be under the supervision of a dog training instructor without the higher cost of private sessions.Dog training classes or private sessions can also be an addition to your own training program.The dog trainer can help you improve the program and customize it to your dog's learning style.Keep things positive and reward your dog for good behavior, and make sure you use a reward your dog will work for.Positive reinforcement is the key to success.You can try to hold your dog's attention with treats and enthusiasm, but know that it is time to end a session when your dog becomes bored or tired.Try to end sessions on a positive note. .

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