Running Dogs Training And Behavior
Behavioral Training

Running Dogs Training And Behavior

  • October 13, 2021

If we can answer this question, we can figure out how to meet your dog’s needs without letting him fly the coop!If your boy dog can smell a female nearby, especially if she’s in heat, he will put in a lot of effort to jump the fence and go meet her.Many dogs readily jump fences or escape the yard to chase down a bunny, squirrel, or another potential prey item.While this is a bit more common in prey-driven breeds like Huskies, almost all dogs naturally enjoy chasing small fluffy animals.In a desperate attempt to escape the terrifying sounds, dogs may leap through windows, bust through screen doors, or even scale high fences.Securing your dog during thunderstorms and fireworks will help keep your pup safe.The main strategy for keeping your dog from running away is relatively straightforward: make it harder to escape.Both underground fences and electronic collars have the potential to burn your dog and are even linked with increased aggression around property lines.Once the fence is secure and you have an idea of why your dog is trying to run away, it’s important to treat the root of the problem:.For prey driven dogs, try using a flirt pole to let him get his instincts out in a safe environment.A trainer will help you come up with a training plan that keeps your dog safe and avoids another visit to the pound to pick up your escapee! .

Fetch the Leash

Fetch the Leash

Fetch the Leash

A world-class education covering all aspects of dog behavior, ethology, the scientific principles of learning, mastering the mechanical skills necessary to be an efficient trainer, effective coaching and class teaching, and more.Decades of hands-on experience training shelter and rescue dogs, as well as hundreds of loved family pets of all ages, sizes, and abilities.Positive, rewards-based training helps dogs develop the skills they need using treats, games, and praise - all the fun stuff in life! .

Reactive Dog Training: Tips To Help Your Dog Get Better

Reactive Dog Training: Tips To Help Your Dog Get Better

Reactive Dog Training: Tips To Help Your Dog Get Better

Even though it may look like our dog is “protective” of us (likely not) or “dominance-aggressive” (also likely not), the most plausible and common reason for his behavior is that he is not happy to be where he is, stressed and (very often)scared.In fact, scolding him for showing his stress through barking, lunging or growling is only going to make him more anxious.Instead, always maintain a calm and collected attitude when your dog gets scared and reacts unfriendly.We can however change these feelings to a calm, neutral and even happy state of mind.Start at large distances and work your way up to being close to the other dog over time.It is better to go slow and wait a little longer – once you cured the reactivity you will be able to enjoy your success for the rest of your dog’s life!Refer to it whenever you are approaching a trigger that would make your dog show a reactive response.Whenever possible, he should be able to sniff, take your treats, follow your cues right away and keep his leash completely relaxed.If you see your dog display these behaviors frequently on walks, he is too stressed to become less reactive.Herding dogs such as Border Collies or Heelers were developed to spend their days in solitude, surrounded only by sheep.Now that we keep many of these previously hardworking dogs as pets, their original function and current use collide.Some irresponsible backyard breeders produce dogs with thin nerves, and some owners do not invest sufficient time into socializing them.For these dogs that cannot go on walks anymore, you want to set up specifically designed reactivity sessions.Refer back to the reactivity chart at the top of this page: Your dog is in the red zone!The reason is that our brains are programmed to only remember fear, stress and negative associations from threatening situations.Even though the outcome was positive, the dog needs to remember the negative event and be very scared and ready to run fast again the next time he encounters a bear.If you approach his trigger too closely, he will not be able to make any lasting, positive associations in the training session.A barking, lunging dog is not the right state of mind to make positive memories.Both times, the dogs with the regular play dates showed less offensive and defensive behavior – they were a lot more relaxed.A word of warning: Only give this supervised and controlled exposure a go if you know your dog and his level of reactivity.Training – obviously – is aimed at changing a dog’s behavior on the long run.Training is a longer process and we rarely see immediate results in behavior modification.The goal of training is to get him (or her) to a point at which he does not require much guidance or outside help anymore to deal with certain situations – we want to have changed his behavior in a way that it will always be appropriate.Or – if he has trouble settling at night, you put your puppy into his crate with a delicious bone.For an anxious and stressed dog it is crucially important to have proper management in place.By having our reactive dogs on a short leash, we can easily increase their stress as they are not able to use body language the way they usually would.As we sense a potential tigger approach, we tend to wrap the leash around our wrist or hold it high up in the air, further restricting our dog’s movement and making him feel like there is only one way out of the situation: outright attack.If you are at a distance to a trigger at which your pup is already lunging and going crazy, you are too close in any way – long line or not.Ideally, you want to always keep your dog at a distance at which he is under his threshold – meaning not stressed enough to “go wild” and not be able to listen to you or take treats anymore.One way to give him relaxed, content downtime is by providing plenty of appropriate chew items.He is not meant to ingest these materials and while most of the time he will probably be fine, if he does happen to get a blockage this will be both dangerous and expensive to treat.Deer antlers are pricey, but the good news is that they will last virtually forever.Once a dog has thoroughly chewed on a cow hoof, it starts to smell quite intensely.Cow hooves can be found in any feed store for less than $1 and provide long-lasting chewing fun for your dog.For any reactive or stressed dog I recommend to make sure you have a few frozen Kongs ready to go at any point in time, so you never run out!One of my doggy day training clients in Albuquerque always has a bully stick ready for me to give to the dog when I leave.The dog already runs to the cupboard with the bully sticks when she sees me getting ready to leave and eagerly awaits her treat.These are plastic chew toys “infused” with some taste, like chicken, bacon or peanut butter.Unfortunately, these toys win in neither tastiness nor safety: On the one hand, many dogs abandon their Nylabones after a few tries since they seem to not thoroughly enjoy the taste.On the other hand, a heavy chewer might well be able to slowly chip away and ingest the plastic of a Nylabone, which again is definitely not what your dog should be eating.Rawhides are great chew articles as long as your dog is not consuming larger amounts of them.If you have a heavy chewer who easily eats a whole retriever roll within minutes, you may want to refrain from giving him rawhides.The safest way to have your dog enjoy rawhides is to only give them to him for a little while and then allow them to dry before the next round.I once had the shock of my life when a pet sitter told me she let a dog chew and eat a whole frisbee throughout the cause of a night.Once they have shown us reactivity we are vigilant to keep them under control and allow them as little access as possible to situations that might become stressful for us and them.It also is a naturally calming activity – one that in fact dogs often seek out by themselves to diffuse potentially tricky situations!His owners take him on two sniff walks every day – one early in the morning and one late at night.Reactive dogs can really benefit from challenged to think carefully and solve puzzles with smartness rather than force.Often dogs are able to for example tip over a cup and eat the treat underneath it once after a couple tries, but when you set up the game again they are as clueless as in their very first attempt.Always repeating the puzzles teaches them to pay attention to their problem solving strategy and to make an effort to remember it as they will need it again!Dogs that have experience in solving puzzles multiple times tend to memorize new behaviors quicker.If our dogs perceive a situation as out of their control, completely new and unknown it can make them feel uncomfortable and anxious.By this “something” I do not mean a toy to play with or a mat to lie on – after all, we might forget these one day – but a trick routine that the dog practices until he is really good at it and can do it in his sleep.Do not pick a 2 minute Sit Stay as part of your routine or balancing on a small wooden beam that your dog can barely stand on.Your dog may already spin when he is excited or expecting something good happening, such as when you come home from work or right before mealtimes.If your dog does not naturally spin yet, you can lure him in a circle with a cookie in front of his nose.Teach your dog to put his front paws up onto an elevated object while his hind feet stay on the ground.If your dog has been doing well with the last trick, you can now stand facing him and move very slowly to the side.This is not a movement he does a lot in his daily life so you want to be patient, move in small steps and reward his efforts generously!You can start out sitting on the ground to prevent him from “cheating” by slipping underneath your leg.Dogs actually are extremely good at learning behavior chains and remembering what even long series of tricks.If you get bored over time with your routine and your dog has learned new tricks, you can add them onto your existing chain!The following has worked for several of my clients who have dogs that are extremely fond of playing frisbee.As a rule of thumb you can assume that your dog will start the next session with the mindset he left the last one with.Instead aim for him to look at you demanding and maybe even be a bit frustrated that your session ended when you call it quits.If your dog ever gets the zoomies, jumps at you for attention or seems to be restless, this is a great time to put his energy to good use by playing.After you have played enough in the remote location that your dog gets the crazy look in his eyes whenever he sees his frisbees, you can move to a slightly more crowded place.Make absolutely sure that you have physical control of him by attaching a long line to him so he cannot take off and get into trouble.Pay attention to being connected to him the whole time – we do not want to give him too much opportunity to look around and potentially get worried about what’s there.At the very least he will learn that he can have fun and a good time in public, and that it is possible to ignore and tune out everything that might bother him for his frisbee.Doing your best to keep everyone safe, help your dog work on the reactivity and still have some fun downtime can be a challenge for everyone.Again – if you are looking for an extensive course to tackle your dog’s reactivity, check out our online class that has helped hundreds of owners and their canine teammates – and it comes with a money-back guarantee to make sure you love it! .

Instinct Dog Behavior & Training: Professional Dog Training

Instinct Dog Behavior & Training: Professional Dog Training

Instinct Dog Behavior & Training: Professional Dog Training

Our teams of certified, veterinarian-recommended dog trainers and behavior consultants welcome all breeds, ages, and behavior issues. .

Door Darting: How to Stop a Dog From Running Out the Door

Door Darting: How to Stop a Dog From Running Out the Door

Door Darting: How to Stop a Dog From Running Out the Door

There he goes again, (expletive deleted)!” Sounds like the unhappy human companion of a door-darter— a dog who slips through an open door every chance he gets.This is frustrating for the human and dangerous for the dog, who romps around having a marvelous time just beyond his owner’s reach, or worse, takes off at a dead run for parts unknown.Why would a well-loved dog who has ample food, water, toys and human attention choose to escape?Finally, if you’ve ever made the mistake of being angry at your dog when you finally got your hands on him, you’ve taught him that being captured makes good stuff go away (he doesn’t get to play anymore) and makes bad stuff happen (you yell at him).Once you’ve corralled your cavorting canine, the part about punishment bears repeating: no matter how upset you are, don’t yell at him!I promise, if you punish him or march him sternly back into the house, he’ll be harder to catch the next time.If you can’t put up a physical fence, install a barrier outside the door(s) — a small area with a self-closing gate, so that if he dashes out, he’s still contained.Don’t even think “underground shock fence”— determined dogs will run through those as easily as through open doors.Baby gates or exercise pens inside can block your dog’s access to escape.Insist that everyone — family and guests alike — makes sure the dog is behind the barrier before they go out the door or greet a visitor.If you keep your canine pal busy and tired, he’ll be less inclined to look for opportunities to make a break for it.If he doesn’t move towards the door, click your clicker or use a verbal marker and give him a tasty treat.Repeat, moving your hand closer toward the doorknob in small increments, clicking and treating each time he remains seated.If he gets up several times in a row, you’re asking too much of him; go back to moving your hand only a few inches toward the knob, and advance more slowly.When you can open the door all the way, take one step through, stop, turn around and face your dog. .

Why Is My Dog Chasing Everything? Tips To Help Curb Chasing

Why Is My Dog Chasing Everything? Tips To Help Curb Chasing

Why Is My Dog Chasing Everything? Tips To Help Curb Chasing

Training your dog to build impulse control and avoid distractions is a good way to curb chasing.Games like fetch and dog sports like Lure Coursing are great ways to channel chasing instincts.The good news is that it’s possible to train your dog to ignore the temptation to chase and even channel that desire into games and sports.When your dog begins to focus on you while leashed, even with squirrels present, you can start to let the pup off-leash in your fenced yard.But keep treating anytime your dog looks at you or moves near you, verbally marking with a “yes” or clicking if you are clicker training.Essentially, you’ll be working with your dog to build focus impulse control — teaching them to remain calm when exciting things are happening and to wait until they are released for something they want.Follow leash laws and practice getting, and keeping, your dog’s attention when passing things that are tempting to chase.Animals like squirrels, raccoons, rats, and bats can carry diseases that can make your dog sick.Tag : Teaching your dog to chase you in your house or a safely fenced-in area can be a fun active game that many pups enjoy.Teaching your dog to chase you in your house or a safely fenced-in area can be a fun active game that many pups enjoy.Lure Coursing: This is a fast and fun sport that challenges a Sighthound’s natural instinct to chase prey.The sport allows Sighthounds to do what comes most naturally to them, showing off their athleticism and ability to follow and chase the “prey.” Lure Coursing is for select breeds over one year of age, including Greyhounds, Basenji, Whippets, Irish Wolfhounds, Pharaoh Hounds, and more.The sport allows Sighthounds to do what comes most naturally to them, showing off their athleticism and ability to follow and chase the “prey.” Lure Coursing is for select breeds over one year of age, including Greyhounds, Basenji, Whippets, Irish Wolfhounds, Pharaoh Hounds, and more.The good thing is that training, games, and sports are a great way to channel your dog’s chase into behaviors that are safe and fun for both of you. .

Leave a Reply

Your email adress will not be published ,Requied fileds are marked*.