Are Shock Collars Good For Dog Training
Obedience Training

Are Shock Collars Good For Dog Training

  • October 9, 2021

Shock collars do not help your dog understand what positive behaviours you are seeking – they only inflict pain for unwanted actions.Shock collars are not more effective than humane training.While punishment-based tools like shock collars can result in changes in your dog’s behaviour, studies have shown that positive, reward-based training is just as effective.Shock collars can harm your dog.Use of shock collars can also habituate your pet to pain and cause increases in aggression and fear-based behaviours. .

Reasons to Avoid Shock Collars and Punishment

Reasons to Avoid Shock Collars and Punishment

Reasons to Avoid Shock Collars and Punishment

Punishment and shock collars are hot topics for dog owners and trainers.I prefer to give people all of the data associated with their specific problem and then decide together the best course of action.If your views are extreme towards force-free training, or are in the opposite direction thinking shock collars are the way to go, you will probably disagree with me.Over the years, I’ve heard the rumors and labels about positive reinforcement training.I’ve heard things like treats are just bribery, or (my favorite) is a “cookie pusher,” like a drug dealer.Used incorrectly, any device can become aversive and unpleasant to the dog, even flat collars and leashes.They may love training so much that the stress doesn’t show up except when you look closely for their tense faces.Their physical signs of stress may have been punished, leaving a dog looking “calm” to the untrained eye… unless you see the worry wrinkles, yawning, and deflated tail.The stress of punishment-based training may not show up for weeks, months, or until a certain situation arises that was associated with the punishment.This book does not have bibliographical references, but Dr. Sidman is a behavioral scientist with impeccable experimental credentials.Using shock therapy in humans would only be administered in a clinical setting by a trained professional with lots of schooling under his or her belt.Dog shock collars are actually illegal in many parts of Europe because they do not believe the public should be using them.There are a few common reasons why pet owners feel stuck in their training and may resort to shock collars.This owner has not done the proper foundation work in order for the dog to be mentally ready for off-leash behaviors.The shock collar trainer will “guarantee” them off-leash compliance in a short period of time.Many owners are stuck in culture fog when it comes to punishment or shock collars.Maybe their parents’ dogs were shock collar trained for field hunting, or maybe their neighbors talked them into it.Positive reinforcement isn’t really on this type of owner’s radar because they have been told that shock collars are the solution.Good dog training should solve problems, not just suppress symptoms through punishment.Dogs are completely reliant upon their owners for everything they need in life, including play, food, water, entertainment, safety.Lack of choice and complete dependence can lead to dogs accepting way more punishment than the average human would ever tolerate.Society would also not tolerate that much punishment between humans for small infractions, like not coming when called or talking too loudly.We focus on teaching what we want dogs and humans to do instead, reward the right choice, and use management to prevent bad behavior.My dogs and I live a life of rewarding good behavior, so the very rare punishment is a small deduction from an overflowing account.Here is the LIMA hierarchy road map that has been adopted by many institutions (human and dog) to define what methods are acceptable for behavior change.Susan Friedman, PhD , the author, runs the Applied Behavior Analysis program at Utah University.I have also talked thousands of clients out of using shock collars or other punishers with a high risk because they didn’t have a good enough foundation in understanding their dog or how behavior works in general.However, I can sleep at night knowing that the worst thing they will do is give a treat at the wrong moment. .

A List Of Things That Shock Collars Are Not — Dog Training with

A List Of Things That Shock Collars Are Not — Dog Training with

A List Of Things That Shock Collars Are Not — Dog Training with

Shock collars are also known as e-collars or remote training collars.Some trainers use shock collars to train dogs to do stuff using negative reinforcement: sit, recall, retrieve, heel, and so on.The trainer will only terminate the electric shock when the dog does what the trainer wants.Some trainers also use them with dogs who are scared of people or who bark and lunge at other dogs (among other ‘nuisance’ behaviours).There are no cases in which positive reinforcement or negative punishment (neither of which use painful or scary consequences) wouldn’t function to train the dogs being shocked, so shock collars are an elective tool.I have used bark collars in the past—much to my regret—before I was a dog trainer.Then, deliver an electric shock to them using a shock collar.If shock collars are just a tap, then they wouldn’t function, certainly, to change a dog’s behaviour.“Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a therapy that uses low-voltage electrical current for pain relief” (source).And further, even when it is uncomfortable, people use TENS to reduce pain.Shock collars are used to change a dog’s behaviour by causing pain or discomfort.They communicate with me through barking, body language, and behaviour.We are (I don’t mean to brag) pretty good communicators, all of us…better than I was at ballet, anyway.Vibrating collars vibrate, and feel (I assume) like your phone on vibrate—in fact, the vibrating phone analogy is sometimes used by shock collar trainers.Often, a dog trainer will hear that a dog doesn’t even need to be shocked anymore, as the vibration (or just ‘holding the collar up’) is enough to alter behaviour.If it didn’t hurt or cause discomfort, it wouldn’t change behaviour.Imagine if your colleague (or child, or your boss for that matter) asked to connect with you by shocking your neck when you didn’t behave exactly as they wanted.If E-Stim is painless, then it is not a shock collar, which functions by causing a painful or uncomfortable electric shock.The only time ‘relief’ comes into play with shock collars is after a long-duration shock ends when the dog being trained does what the trainer wants, which is what negative reinforcement is. .

Dog collars

Dog collars

Dog collars

Every dog needs a collar, chiefly because they need something on which to hang their leash, license, ID and rabies vaccination tag.It has a buckle or plastic snap ("quick-release") closure and a ring for attaching identification tags and leash and is available in many colors and designs.This collar is designed for dogs with narrow heads such as Greyhounds, Salukis, Whippets and other sighthounds.One strap of the collar fits around your dog's neck and sits high on the head, just behind the ears.As with any training equipment, the head halter is not intended to be used in a jerking or yanking fashion but rather to gently steer your dog in the direction you need them to go.It may take some time, patience and lots of treats to get your dog accustomed to wearing a head collar.Don't leave the head collar on your dog all the time; eventually they will manage to pull off the muzzle loop and use it as their chew toy! .

The Science of Dog Training: Is It Okay To Use A Shock Collar?

The Science of Dog Training: Is It Okay To Use A Shock Collar?

The Science of Dog Training: Is It Okay To Use A Shock Collar?

G/O Media may get a commission Save $63 Lepow 15.6" Portable Monitor Delivers a truly immersive viewing experience.In other words, you can shock a dog all you want, but if it can't make the association between the pain and its own barking, then it will never learn to stop.This is an extremely nuanced point: there is no question that shock collars have the capability of inducing distress in an animal.However it is not necessarily the case that they induce distress "when used in accordance with best practice by trainers experienced in their use," writes University of Lincoln researcher Jonathan J. Cooper in the journal PLoS ONE.On the other hand, various veterinary associations claim that reward-based methods can be equally effective as punishment-based ones, and lack even the possibility for welfare risks.Their use is illegal in at least four European countries (Austria, Denmark, Finland, Germany) and is restricted in three others (Czech Republic, Hungary, Italy).The scant research that has been done on the use of shock collars has focused primarily on dogs being trained for police work or hunting, while the most common use is with regular household pets.That's why Cooper and colleagues set out to determine (1) whether shock collars used to train household pets were effective, and (2) what were the associated welfare consequences.Cooper's group rounded up 63 pet dogs in the UK, none of whom had prior experience with shock collars, and all of whom were older than six months, and whose owners reported some persistent problem that they wished to eliminate.The dogs were split into three groups, with roughly equivalent distributions in terms of sex, age, and breed.In addition, dogs were rewarded with positive reinforcement such as food, play, or praise for compliance with their instructions.Finally, a pair of trainers who belonged to the Association of Pet Dog Trainers (APDT), a UK-based group opposed to the use of shock collars, worked with Group C. The training period in all cases lasted five days, with two fifteen-minute sessions per day.A whopping 91.8% of owners reported improvements in their dogs' behavior following training, with no differences across groups, and all were highly satisfied with the results.There were no differences between the groups for the amount of corticosteroids in dogs' urine, a physiological marker of stress.One is that neither approach to dog training is more or less effective than the other, in terms of improving obedience and reducing an unwanted behavior, even under the most ideal of circumstances.The second is that despite the lack of physiological indicators of stress, "there are still behavioural differences that are consistent with a more negative experience for dogs trained with e-collars," according to Cooper.Since training with shock collars was no more effective than without, the tradeoff in terms of animal welfare is – at least in most cases – unacceptable.

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Electronic collars in dog training: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Electronic collars in dog training: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Electronic collars in dog training: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

To the balanced trainer, a shock collar is an must have training tool that will achieve results quickly.First, let’s talk about what an electronic collar is and what it is used for in dog training.These first generation electronic dog collars could only deliver one level of stimulation to the dog.Today, these collars are used for everything from training recall to electronic fencing geared to keep a dog in the yard to curbing barking and so on.There was a time when I had strong emotions about one method or another but I have learned to empathize with the owner struggle to find something that works when they have a difficult dog.The dog does a behavior.To break down the “why” as to how this works in the brain you need to understand how associations are formed to begin with.Associations are how all of us learn.Skinner wanted to further build on the basics of classical conditioning by using a series of experiments involving both humans and rats.Skinner showed how a combination of positive punishment and negative reinforcement worked by placing a rat in his Skinner box and then subjecting it to an unpleasant electric current.The rats quickly learned to go straight to the lever after a few times of being put in the box to end the shock.The rats soon learned to press the lever when the light came on because they knew that this would stop the electric current before it hit.These two learned responses are known as Escape Learning and Avoidance Learning.And this is essentially how and why a shock collar works.The dog is learning – it learns through avoidance.Electronic collars that work in association with electric fencing are designed to function even when you aren’t around.Remember, though, a shock collar may keep your dog from leaving the yard, but it will not stop humans or other animals from entering.When used correctly, with good time, the collars are not just good for positive punishment.Your dog learns to live in a suppressive device rather than developing good habits and learning to make healthy, rewarding choices.Punished behavior is not forgotten, it’s only suppressed – the unwanted behavior returns when punishment is no longer present.When we think about the ways in which shock collars are most commonly used – bark collars and electronic fences – this can be a risk we have to take into consideration.When your dog wants to run out of the yard to greet another dog and he gets zapped, he may associate the stimulus with leaving the yard or he may associate the stimulus with the other dog that passes the house every day.You would eventually learn to feel your way around but if no one has ever taken the time to show you what they want, you will have learned to survive but you will not thrive.Even if our timing is a little off, it may slow down learning but there is no risk of misplaced associations and aggression or anxiety issues.When your dog gets excited and goes into flight or chase mode they may just run right through the fence and not even feel the stimulations.As a trainer I try to keep my emotions out of the training arena.I am also a trainer who at one time did use electronic collars and I veered away from them after time because I started to see the positives and negatives.In one of my dogs, all of the training that was done on the collar not only disappeared but the behavior returned stronger after I took the collar off of my dog and we ended up having to start training over from scratch.My heart breaks for the dogs I have had to see euthanized because of anxiety and fear issues that developed after the use of an electronic collar.As a trainer who specializes in reactivity and aggression I can tell you that in more than half of the cases I am called into there is a history of aversive training that has been used on the dogs, whether that training was done with the use of a pinch collar, shock collar, choke collar, etc.The correlation between positive punishment and aggression is very high.A dog who’s personality and behavior is suppressed through aversives is not a well behaved dog, though it may appear that way.I leveled with the client that the dog was just that – a time bomb – and that given their refusal to change the training methods, the dogs aggression issues, and the dog’s size that the prognosis for the dog was not good.In the end, I have personally found much more success with positive reinforcement, systematic desensitization and counter conditioning, relationship building skills, and affective dog behavior training (need based training).My personal recommendation to anyone with questions would be to reach out to a qualified behavior consultant through the PPG, the IAABC, of the APDT. .

How and Why to Train Your Dog With an Electronic Collar

How and Why to Train Your Dog With an Electronic Collar

How and Why to Train Your Dog With an Electronic Collar

Electronic training collars, or remote training collars, have been around a long time.I know this because I test the collars before they go on my canines every day by holding the contact points in the palm of my hand and hitting the stimulation button.I adjust my pace to turn the annoyance off, which is the same principle behind remote training collars.You get in, turn on the ignition, and if you don’t buckle up, the beeper goes off.Why Use a Remote Training Collar?You also have to have the ability to correct behavior.“Dogs in training are often over-talked, over-touched and over-excited by a trainer,” Deeley added.With a remote training collar, you are always in the position to gently enforce a command.Remote Dog Training Collars: Get Started.Before you start collar conditioning, your pup must know its basic obedience commands.Allow me to state, again: If your canine does not know its basic commands, it is not ready for a remote training collar.Remote training collars are our BFF’s everyday collar.The collar’s power stays off unless we are training, or if we are in a situation where I might need to enforce a command.The most important part of using a remote training collar is selecting the stimulation level.According to Deeley, “The sensation produced should be adjusted to a level that the dog understands and accepts as part of the training communication.”.For the collar to work, the contact points need to be touching skin.Three fingers underneath the collar probably means that it is too loose, and the contact points are not touching the skin.Work up from the lowest stimulation level, until your furry friend seems annoyed by something.As far as nerve tissue, Dr. Barrowclough said, “[Canines] feel pain but their reactions to it are much different than humans.The basis of collar conditioning is that the annoyance goes away when your dog obeys you.You don’t want to attach it to the remote collar.Give your BFF the “sit” command.This is on you, not your dog.Stimulate them with the continuous button at their baseline setting, while simultaneously giving the “come” command with great enthusiasm.The process of the canine learning to turn the annoyance off by obeying is the entire principle behind obedience training with a remote collar.This is why you work with a check cord until the only way that your dog knows to turn the annoyance off is by obeying – not bolting.How You Should (and Should NOT) Use a Training Collar.If you’re having a bad day, don’t even turn your pup’s collar on.From this point, I highly recommend that you work with a trainer in your area who trains working dogs, and who trains your breed.

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Shock Collars: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

Shock Collars: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

Shock Collars: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

Shock collars are used to train dogs to stay in or out of a certain area, as in electric fencing; or to dissuade them from certain unwanted behaviors.Proponents of shock collars say that the jolt the dog receives from a collar is not painful at all.So to help you decide, here is the good, the bad, and the ugly on shock collars.Because the shock is something that your dog has never experienced before, he will likely learn very quickly that a jolt means he should stop what he’s doing and look to you for instruction.In theory, he will quickly come to associate the warning beep or vibration that comes before a shock with the unwanted behavior you are trying to correct.If the dog gets too close to the boundary in the yard, he will get the initial warning signal.While it is perfectly acceptable for dog owners to take on the challenge of training rather than hiring a professional, there can be danger in inexperience.Some may even have pre-existing fears and anxieties that would make the use of a shock collar counterproductive.Most dogs who bite do so out of fear, not aggression.Positive training with a verbal reward or treat can do wonders for a dog’s confidence, while shock collar training may teach your dog to fear or distrust you.Your Dog May Associate The Shock With Something Besides His Behavior.Shock Collars May Actually Cause Aggressive Behavior.Some dogs will attack any person or animal who comes close to the barrier of the electric fence. .

13 Best Dog Training Collars of 2021 (Shock Collar Reviews)

13 Best Dog Training Collars of 2021 (Shock Collar Reviews)

13 Best Dog Training Collars of 2021 (Shock Collar Reviews)

While typically considered the least humane of all training methods, not all dog owners want collars like this.You can also find training collars that deliver correction by ultrasonic beeps, light, or vibration.You can find handheld devices or collars that emit piercing ultrasonic beeps undetectable to the human ear but intensely irritating to dogs.This form of training device won’t annoy your or the neighbors but should certainly pull your dog up when he starts raising Cain.A vibration collar is totally humane and pain-free but you might struggle with this form of correction if you have a stubborn or particularly aggressive dog.This kind of collar kicks out correction similar to the static shocks you’ll have experienced yourself.If you don’t like the idea of inflicting that level of pain on your dog, these collars are not for you and you have plenty of other options at your disposal.If, for any reason, you don’t like the idea of a citronella spray, you can opt for unscented cartridges.Your dog won’t be too happy if you spray his snout with anything so you might well find results using this kind of collar.If you have a large and stubborn dog at home, you’ll know he often needs a firmer hand if you need to encourage him to behave.You should check closely that the collar you’re considering is designed to fit your size and breed of dog.Many of the collars we showcase today allow you to use a single remote so you won’t be juggling appliances.Whether you often train your dog in the rain or you go for a walk along by the ocean or river, protect yourself by making certain you get an appropriately waterproofed unit.You should make sure the collar you’re looking at is rugged enough that it won’t give up the ghost a few months down the line.Equally as important as durability, ensure the collar is comfy and compact enough for your dog so he can wear it without feeling burdened or irritated.Whether you prefer using static shock, ultrasonic beeps, or vibration, choose what works best for your pooch and stick with it.If you find static correction most effective, you’ll be able to flick through a full 99 progressive levels delivering increasingly intense shocks to deal with stubborn dogs.With 9 channels up for grabs, add extra collars so you can train multiple dogs with a single remote.Range is an impressive 900 feet so you’ll be free to roam around the park without losing control.A neat security lock prevents accidental mis-operation and keeps your dog safe from inappropriate correction.If so, the 1500-foot range this collar from SportDOG serves up allows you to stay in total control from a distance.You can press the same remote into commission to train up to 3 dogs saving you money and cutting down on the amount of gear you’ll need to take out.Price-wise, you’ll need to dig a little deeper so make sure this collar sits nicely with your budget before you probe too much further.Like most of the best dog training collars, you can grab a quick blast of charge in as little as 2 hours if the batteries are flat are you’re heading out for walkies.Completely waterproof so ideal for training un all winds and weathers, the SportDOG isn’t cheap but you’ll get exceptional value for money.Bottom Line: If you’re looking for a top-notch training collar you can use with more than one dog, the SportDOG 425X isn’t cheap but then the best things in life seldom are.The water-resistant design gives you complete freedom to train your pooch in huge spaces without losing control.If you run into any issues, there’s a robust customer care wing in place to deal with all your queries expediently.Rugged and durable, enjoy using multiple levels of correction to fine-tune things for the temperament of your pooch.Cons: A few reported issues with quality control so check the contents of your package closely upon receipt.Bottom Line: If you want a versatile training collar offering multiple levels of progressive correction you can tailor to dogs up to 25-inch neck size.If you don’t like the idea of using static shocks to correct your dog, you can opt for vibration instead.Bottom Line: If you want a wide-reaching collar giving you the scope to train more than one dog at a time, the Dogtra Fieldmaster is a must.Choose from a wide array of colors to find the perfect training collar for your furball.100 levels of shock allow you to gradually ramp up correction if your dog doesn’t seem to get the message.This is a superb and totally humane alternative to static shocks and makes this a highly versatile training device.Battery life is reasonably impressive and you won’t need more than 2 to 3 hours to deliver a full burst of charge.If you have deep pockets and you’re hunting for a top-notch dog training collar that will last for years, we bring you the Educator E-Collar.Coming in a variety of colorways, you can easily find something to suit the temperament and style of your beloved furball.100 baseline levels of correction are complemented by another 60 boost options giving you unparalleled versatility when training.The remote is designed much like a traditional stopwatch and it’s a compact, lightweight unit that won’t burden you when you’re out on a walk.The dual-charger thrown in can return a complete charge in as little as 2 hours so you’ll never be caught without your collar and remote when it’s time for walkies.Bottom Line: If you have a flexible budget and you’re looking for a training collar with a broad range of levels, the Educator E-Collar is well worth popping on your shortlist.Dogs loathe the smell of citrus and dislike their snouts getting wet so take advantage of that with this little diamond from PetSafe.The Spray Trainer is designed to let you train a couple of days from the same remote saving you money and hassle.For anyone disinclined to use static shock correction, a spray collar is a highly effective alternative and 100% humane.Pros: Sharp bursts of citronella or unscented spray should correct your dog from barking excessively.Cons: You’ll need to factor in ongoing cost of cartridges and also remember to keep a supply on hand.Bottom Line: If you don’t like the idea of static correction and your dog doesn’t respond well to ultrasonic beeps or vibration, this spray collar is the obvious and completely humane solution.The collar will also stand up to the occasional dip if you’re walking by the ocean and your dog likes to dive in.You can rotate through 18 levels of static correction which should give you enough leeway to prod even stubborn dogs into behaving.For anyone who doesn’t like the idea of static shock, there’s ultrasonic beeps or vibration to choose from instead.While some disgruntled customers have pointed out this collar let them down, we feel build quality is strong.Bottom Line: Place your trust in the GPS specialist and guide your dog with the Garmin Delta.Whether you choose static shock, vibration, or audible beeps, you should be able to find something that works for even stubborn pooches.The Dogtra IQ-PLUS makes a great choice if you have a small but stubborn dog and you need to train him effectively.The 1200-foot range is ideal if you frequently head out into wide open with your dog but you’d still like to remain in charge.Both collar and remote are fully waterproofed giving you a flexible outdoor training aid.Bottom Line: For a flexible, affordable, and highly capable training collar from an industry legend, give the IQ-PLUS a shot and bring your dog to heel.Another entry from Garmin as we edge to the close of our dog training collar reviews, the Sport PRO is a hard-hitter if you’ve got a fluid budget.The menu is a cinch to manipulate and you can easily access a suite of correction methods so you can bring even stubborn dogs into line.If you want to disengage static correction, rely instead on the completely humane ultrasonic beep or pulsing vibration.For a powerful and versatile training collar from a highly reputable brand, the Sport PRO is a must.Another superb and completely waterproof training collar from Dogtra, the 1900S continues to fly off the shelves with just cause.127 correction levels ensure you have a huge range of intensity at which you can shock your dog into towing the line.If he doesn’t respond well to static shocks or you would prefer not to use this form of training, use beeps or vibration instead.For this reason, the 1900S is a neat choice if you’ve never tried training your dog before and you don’t know how he’ll respond.Bottom Line: If you’re prepared to dig deep, Dogtra 1900S is a powerful and adaptable training solution giving you great range and a choice of correction methods.If you dislike the idea of shocking your dog into behaving, use vibration, light, or audible beeps instead.Bottom Line: If you’re searching for a cheap and cheerful training collar that doesn’t stiff you on the performance front, road test the Petronics today.With our reviews put to bed, you should now be able to see clearly which type of collar would work best for your dog.If you’re a complete beginner to training and you’re not entirely sure how your dog will respond to various methods of correction, we’d recommend getting a multipurpose collar offering you the choice of ultrasonic beeps, pulsing vibration, and static shock.Failing that, it’s worth calling in a professional dog trainer, even if you only have a couple of sessions so you can become more confident handling your pooch.Here are 6 simple guidelines to help you use your new dog training collar with ease without causing any harm to your beloved pooch.There’s little doubt you can use punitive measures to stop animals from acting a certain way but the change won’t be meaningful or long-lasting.Try instead interweaving loads of love and treats so your dog clearly sees the benefits of behaving and the drawbacks of stepping out of line.Think closely about the type of behavior you’re looking to correct so you can get the safest and most efficient form of training collar fuss-free.While you might feel tempted to shock your obstinate and feisty canine into action, you’ll end up making the problem even worse.To round out today, we’ve collected and answered the most frequently asked questions about dog training collars so you have all the information you need in one place….These collars come in many different varieties but the purpose is the same: to correct your dog from barking excessively.Correction is delivered by static shock, vibrations, ultrasonic beeps or sprays of liquid, often citronella since dogs despise the smell of citrus.If you are intent on using static correction, start at the low end of the scale and slowly work your way upward.You’ll also obviously save money since you don’t need to buy complete units for each dog.You won’t be able to hear the noise emitted but it should be annoying enough to your dog that he’ll mend his ways.If you find that static shock, beeps, and vibration are all failing to get results, we’d strongly recommend road testing a spray collar as a last resort.If you find your dog is in any way irritated by the collar you’ve chosen, you should immediately discontinue use.These collars pick up on the sound of your dog barking as well as the movement in his throat then deliver correction correspondingly.Static shock, vibration, and ultrasonic beeps can all be effective, it’s just a case of finding out what works for your dog.We hope by now you’ve got a clear idea of exactly what type of training collar would make the best fit for you and your dog.Equally, if you find that static shock collars are not working on your canine, don’t get frustrated and start ramping up the intensity level.If you pay close attention to our brief guide above, you should have no problems choosing the best dog training collar and you should also be confident that you can use the equipment safely.In closing, we’d just like to reiterate once more the crucial role of positive reinforcement when you’re trying to teach your dog right from wrong.As with any type of discipline, unless it’s mixed in with plenty of positive reinforcement like hugs and treats, you’re unlikely to generate long-term results.We’ve just lined up an ambitious content calendar and we’re hard at work to bring you everything you need to get your dog all the best equipment without taking too much time or trouble.As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases - at no cost to you, allowing us to continue our work. .

Best Dog Training Collars With No Shock

Best Dog Training Collars With No Shock

Best Dog Training Collars With No Shock

The transmitter for the collar has touch-distinctive buttons that allow you to select vibration or tone to give feedback to your dog.There are 16 levels of vibration intensity to choose from, and the transmitter has a range of 660 yards – plenty for an average house dog!The battery life is pretty impressive, lasting up to 10 days after being fully charged.Another handy feature is the LCD screen on the transmitter, making it easy to see the settings you’ve selected.You’ll need to make sure you train your dog properly for these collars to work correctly.While citronella is a natural, plant-based oil that is not harmful, dogs still don’t care for the smell and will associate this awful scent with negative behaviors.However, when you weigh the cost against the price of a professional trainer, it suddenly doesn’t seem so bad!PetSafe does sell refill bottles of the citronella on Amazon, so don’t fret if you go through the first cartridges quickly!The collar is triggered when the built-in microphone detects your dog barking and sprays a burst of citronella to discourage the behavior.Downtown’s Spray Collar is recommended for dogs weighing 6 pounds or more, but keep in mind that the cartridge is a bit more bulky and heavy than other choices.If you’re looking for a hybrid option between manual and automatic, Queenmew has the perfect collar for you and your dog!After you turn the collar on, you can activate the manual mode by simply pressing any button on the transmitter.If one minute has passed and the collar does not detect a signal from the transmitter, it activates the automatic mode, using its built-in microphone to sense when your dog barks.The transmitter requires two AAA batteries, but Queenmew does include a set when you first purchase the collar.While it’s listed as being waterproof, the manufacturer’s notes do say to remove the collar when your dog is swimming or bathing.If these are the issues you’re trying to address in your dog, the Gentle Leader is an ideal solution without using any sprays, shock or vibration collars, or choke chains. .

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