Are Training Collars Good For Dogs
Tracking

Are Training Collars Good For Dogs

  • October 16, 2021

A flat collar should fit comfortably on your dog's neck; it should not be so tight as to choke your dog nor so loose that they can slip out of it.The leash attaches to a ring on this loop.When your dog tries to back out of the martingale, the collar tightens around their neck.Head collar.The leash attaches to the ring at the bottom of the muzzle loop.To be effective, the head collar must be properly fitted.Don't leave the head collar on your dog all the time; eventually they will manage to pull off the muzzle loop and use it as their chew toy! .

A List Of Things That Shock Collars Are Not — Dog Training with

A List Of Things That Shock Collars Are Not — Dog Training with

A List Of Things That Shock Collars Are Not — Dog Training with

Shock collars are also known as e-collars or remote training collars.Some trainers use shock collars to train dogs to do stuff using negative reinforcement: sit, recall, retrieve, heel, and so on.The trainer will only terminate the electric shock when the dog does what the trainer wants.Some trainers also use them with dogs who are scared of people or who bark and lunge at other dogs (among other ‘nuisance’ behaviours).There are no cases in which positive reinforcement or negative punishment (neither of which use painful or scary consequences) wouldn’t function to train the dogs being shocked, so shock collars are an elective tool.I have used bark collars in the past—much to my regret—before I was a dog trainer.Then, deliver an electric shock to them using a shock collar.If shock collars are just a tap, then they wouldn’t function, certainly, to change a dog’s behaviour.“Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a therapy that uses low-voltage electrical current for pain relief” (source).And further, even when it is uncomfortable, people use TENS to reduce pain.Shock collars are used to change a dog’s behaviour by causing pain or discomfort.They communicate with me through barking, body language, and behaviour.We are (I don’t mean to brag) pretty good communicators, all of us…better than I was at ballet, anyway.Vibrating collars vibrate, and feel (I assume) like your phone on vibrate—in fact, the vibrating phone analogy is sometimes used by shock collar trainers.Often, a dog trainer will hear that a dog doesn’t even need to be shocked anymore, as the vibration (or just ‘holding the collar up’) is enough to alter behaviour.If it didn’t hurt or cause discomfort, it wouldn’t change behaviour.Imagine if your colleague (or child, or your boss for that matter) asked to connect with you by shocking your neck when you didn’t behave exactly as they wanted.If E-Stim is painless, then it is not a shock collar, which functions by causing a painful or uncomfortable electric shock.The only time ‘relief’ comes into play with shock collars is after a long-duration shock ends when the dog being trained does what the trainer wants, which is what negative reinforcement is. .

5 Reasons not to use a shock collar

5 Reasons not to use a shock collar

5 Reasons not to use a shock collar

Shock collars do not help your dog understand what positive behaviours you are seeking – they only inflict pain for unwanted actions.Using aversive training methods based on fear and pain may result in your dog avoiding you, or even becoming aggressive with you.Using humane training based on rewards instead of punishment addresses unwanted behaviours without jeopardizing the special relationship you share with your pet.While punishment-based tools like shock collars can result in changes in your dog’s behaviour, studies have shown that positive, reward-based training is just as effective.The electrostatic shock can cause psychological distress for your pet, including phobias and high levels of stress, and can result in unhealthy increases in heart rate and painful burns to your dog’s skin. .

Shock Collars: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

Shock Collars: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

Shock Collars: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

Shock collars are used to train dogs to stay in or out of a certain area, as in electric fencing; or to dissuade them from certain unwanted behaviors.Proponents of shock collars say that the jolt the dog receives from a collar is not painful at all.So to help you decide, here is the good, the bad, and the ugly on shock collars.Because the shock is something that your dog has never experienced before, he will likely learn very quickly that a jolt means he should stop what he’s doing and look to you for instruction.In theory, he will quickly come to associate the warning beep or vibration that comes before a shock with the unwanted behavior you are trying to correct.If the dog gets too close to the boundary in the yard, he will get the initial warning signal.While it is perfectly acceptable for dog owners to take on the challenge of training rather than hiring a professional, there can be danger in inexperience.Some may even have pre-existing fears and anxieties that would make the use of a shock collar counterproductive.Most dogs who bite do so out of fear, not aggression.Positive training with a verbal reward or treat can do wonders for a dog’s confidence, while shock collar training may teach your dog to fear or distrust you.Your Dog May Associate The Shock With Something Besides His Behavior.Shock Collars May Actually Cause Aggressive Behavior.Some dogs will attack any person or animal who comes close to the barrier of the electric fence. .

The 9 Best Dog Training Collars of 2021

The 9 Best Dog Training Collars of 2021

The 9 Best Dog Training Collars of 2021

The eXuby collar has a small receiver that won’t weigh your pet down, and it still provides settings for sound, vibration, and stimulation.Your leash clips on under their chin, and if your dog ever starts to pull, the padded nose loop creates gentle pressure to deter the behavior without any choking.The PetSafe Gentle Leader Head Collar can help stop this unwanted behavior, as its unique design redirects your dog’s attention whenever they start to pull.The collar’s bark-sensing technology prevents ambient noises from triggering the spray, and its battery can last for up to 40 hours per charge.The brand claims that the collar can help correct the behavior in as little as two weeks, and because the spray is triggered automatically, it can even be used to stop barking while you’re not home.When you’re using this training tool, you can choose between 16 stimulation levels and 8 vibration intensities to suit your dog’s needs, and these settings can be adjusted using two buttons on the side of the remote.The collar receiver is waterproof for use in the rain or while swimming, and it comes with two sets of contact prongs for dogs with different coats.One common complaint about dog training collars is that their remotes are too complicated, making them tricky to operate, especially in time-sensitive situations.This might not seem like a big deal, but many people have misconceptions about what training collars are and how they should be used...The information was extremely helpful to me, and I think it would benefit other owners, too.The SportDOG 425X Remote Trainer can be used for hunting and sporting dogs thanks to its superior range and waterproof design."My only real complaint about the design of this training collar is that the receiver is fairly large—I’d say it’s roughly 2 x 1 x 1.5 inches and surprisingly heavy.If you don’t need a stimulation setting, the WOLFWILL Training Collar solely offers tone and vibration modes.The collar receiver is waterproof up to 5 feet, and the remote includes a wrist strap for convenient carrying.The collar itself fits necks up to 28 inches, and this product is reasonably priced, making it a great choice for anyone who’s trying the e-collar training method for the first time."It only took a few tries for [my dog] to figure out that coming immediately saved her the annoyance of the static shock, and by the end of our first training session, she was responding more reliably.Final Verdict The Educator E-Collar Remote Dog Training Collar offers a 1/2 mile range and 100 stimulation levels, as well as vibration and noise settings, making it one of the most comprehensive options available.When you press a button on the remote, it sends a radio signal to the receiver, triggering some type of stimulation, whether it’s a noise, vibration, or shock.Additionally, it’s important to regularly check your dog’s neck to ensure the collar is not causing any type of irritation—if it is, you should stop using it until their skin and coat has healed.This article was written by Camryn Rabideau, a lifelong animal lover who has raised and trained several dogs of various breeds and temperaments. .

5 Common Myths About Electronic Dog Training Collars

5 Common Myths About Electronic Dog Training Collars

5 Common Myths About Electronic Dog Training Collars

Myth #1: An e-collar will hurt your dog.The stimulation provided by an e-collar is a static shock, similar to what you have probably experienced yourself on a dry winter day.Used correctly, an e-collar will not hurt your dog.Myth #2: The e-collar will burn his neck.Myth #3: E-collar training will make your dog fearful of you.Myth #4: Electronic training is only for hunting dogs. .

The Prong Collar Debate: A Trainer's Opinion

The Prong Collar Debate: A Trainer's Opinion

The Prong Collar Debate: A Trainer's Opinion

Walking a dog that pulls on leash is not only frustrating but it can also be dangerous so it is common for concerned pet parents to look for simple solutions with many turning to what many might consider controversial training equipment like prong collars and choke chains.Furthermore, the use of the prong collar means that the dog is more protected from potentially being euthanized due to biting out of fear or exhibiting leash anxiety that can lead to aggression.The water is less murky here, as we have science backing recent studies to explain the potential dangers behind the use of prong collars and choke chains.Prong collars work by putting pressure on a dog’s throat which can lead to severe injuries of their thyroid glands and trachea.This can lead to other serious health problems down the road like hypothyroidism, weight gain, ear infections, hair loss, skin issues and even organ failure.In fact, dogs who are already reactive on walks and who already suffer from leash anxiety were found to become more anxious and agitated upon prolonged exposure to uncomfortable and painful prong and choke collars, with the collars leading to greater stress in dogs and therefore leading to a higher risk for potential aggression and bites on owners.Furthermore, studies also found that prong collars and choke chains while initially effective in stopping dogs from pulling on leash, may actually be ineffective in the long run.What’s even more alarming is that anything present in the dog’s environment while he is wearing a prong or choke collar has the potential to take on a negative association.If Prong Collars Are Potentially Dangerous And Even Ineffective, Why Do Some Trainers Still Recommend Them For Dogs Who Pull On Leash?The purpose of this, according to Leerburg Training, is not to cause pain, but when applied with a quick correction should take the breath away from a dog just enough to stop unwanted behavior.The question arises, can these trainers really expect every day dog owners (most with very little knowledge of canine anatomy or psychology) to know how to use this equipment “properly”?This usually required the use of discomfort, pain, and punishment during training sessions to elicit submissive behaviors from a dog.According to a study done by the Journal of Veterinary Behavior, aversive training methods using punishment and pain were actually found to harm dogs not only physically, but mentally as well.And while these types of training techniques may work initially, they can have long term and even permanent effects on a dog’s overall mental health.The harnesses we recommend are all harm-free, reward-based, and backed by positive reinforcement experts who understand the psychology of dogs and why they behave the way they do.The easy fix to your dog’s pulling problem would be if he is simply wearing the wrong equipment.Many dogs have a natural instinct to pull against a harness that is putting pressure on their chest or back. .

How and Why to Train Your Dog With an Electronic Collar

How and Why to Train Your Dog With an Electronic Collar

How and Why to Train Your Dog With an Electronic Collar

Trainers of working dogs enforcing commands from a distance embraced the earliest models.Those early collars had limited stimulation settings, and it was not very friendly for the dog wearing it.The reality is that the stimulation — when properly adjusted — annoys the dog, but it doesn’t hurt it.I know this because I test the collars before they go on my canines every day by holding the contact points in the palm of my hand and hitting the stimulation button.For perspective, the vibrate feature on my Garmin ForeRunner HRM watch is more of an annoyance to me than level 1 on any of my remote training collars.I adjust my pace to turn the annoyance off, which is the same principle behind remote training collars.As pro trainer Bill Grimmer pointed out, a remote training collar is analogous to the seat belt beeper in your car.“In off leash environments, e-collars provide the ability to communicate with your dog, guiding and helping them to avoid potentially dangerous situations,” Deeley said.There is a process that takes months of work that must be carefully followed to fully realize.Before you start collar conditioning, your pup must know its basic obedience commands.This level of obedience allows me to take them wherever I go – from hikes in Colorado’s Weminuchee Wilderness to remote camps in Alaska, where really big bears are encountered every day.Allow me to state, again: If your canine does not know its basic commands, it is not ready for a remote training collar.The most important part of using a remote training collar is selecting the stimulation level.According to Deeley, “The sensation produced should be adjusted to a level that the dog understands and accepts as part of the training communication.”.If your canine has a long coat, your collar brand of choice will come with longer contact points that will help.Three fingers underneath the collar probably means that it is too loose, and the contact points are not touching the skin.If your BFF vocalizes, if their ears go down, or if they tuck their tail underneath their body, that means the stimulation is too high.According to DVM Katie Barrowclough, canines have more muscles in their neck compared to humans.As far as nerve tissue, Dr. Barrowclough said, “[Canines] feel pain but their reactions to it are much different than humans.If they will not reliably sit when told, then take a giant step back in your training.Stimulate them with the continuous button at their baseline setting, while simultaneously giving the “come” command with great enthusiasm.The process of the canine learning to turn the annoyance off by obeying is the entire principle behind obedience training with a remote collar.Every time you give the “come” command, be prepared to issue stimulation if they do not obey.Furthermore, treat every time you issue the “come” command as a learning opportunity for your dog.This is why you work with a check cord until the only way that your dog knows to turn the annoyance off is by obeying – not bolting.A remote training collar is a super powerful tool because it enables you to enforce commands at a distance.This buys your BFF freedom to be off-lead– knowing that if a deer, skunk, other human, or a fast-moving dump truck come into your space, you have complete control.Deeley nicely summarized it by saying, “The e-collar is a training tool that enhances communication, provides consistent reliable feedback even at increasing distance, and it creates a positive relationship with reduced stress between the dog and handler to help accomplish training goals.”.A remote training collar will run a few hundred dollars, so budget to spend around $100 more to enlist a trainer to help you truly understand the process.

.

Dog Training Collars

Dog Training Collars

Dog Training Collars

This is especially true for dogs who pull on leash for whom collars can place dangerous pressure on the fragile trachea.The right kind of harness can help to successfully master loose leash walking, especially if used alongside positive reinforcement training methods.Note: This article has been updated with reviews and additional writing from certified professional dog trainer, Shoshi Parks.The Ruffwear No Pull Harness offers extra padding and surface area to distribute pressure evenly, helping prevent back and neck strain.This comfortable, adjustable harness is a good choice to transition from training to regular walks, particularly for short-necked or flat-faced dogs.Martingales are especially recommended for dogs with small heads and long necks (such as greyhounds) for whom a regular collar can easily fall off.A wide band helps to evenly distribute pressure around your dog’s neck.Be sure to read the instructions on how to fit the collar correctly for your dog and never jerk or pull the leash when in use.Dogs can still open their mouths to eat, drink, pant, fetch, and bark.When they try to pull ahead, the tension on the leash causes them to slow down without restricting the movement of their front legs.This harness also has an attachment at the back to use once your dog has learned not to pull, and a seatbelt strap for safer car rides.Plain old flat collars, used in conjunction with consistent positive-reinforcement training, work well for many dogs.The durable Blueberry Designer Basic Dog Collar comes in an endless array of fun colors and patterns.This lightweight 6-foot Pawtitas Solid Puppy Leash offers a lot of value for the price.While we don’t recommend elastic leashes for dogs that pull, they can help to absorb some shock while beachcombing, on a “sniffari,” or while walking with your puppy on uneven terrain without compromising their safety.Stretchy, elastic leash absorbs shock at high speeds or on uneven terrain.Available in either 4-foot or 6-foot lengths, this Max and Neo nylon reflective dog leash features double handles.For pups, that traffic handle is especially helpful for providing a little extra control over eager greeters who want to show their love by jumping all over new friends.This 5-foot BAAPET dog leash is a durable option for puppies who are aggressive chewers.Made of chew-resistant reinforced stainless steel wrapped in a waterproof plastic casing, this leash is still lightweight enough to use with small pups.While I generally do not recommend retractible leashes, when used properly and with discretion, some pet owners do find them useful.When released, it expands up to 10 feet to give your pet plenty of freedom during walks, but it can also lock at shorter lengths for more control.But remember, retractable leashes can be dangerous for both dogs and their walkers, and should always be used with extreme caution and never in busy or high-traffic environments.Collars that cause pain or discomfort are dangerous because of the pressure they apply on a dog’s trachea, neck, and spine, and the way they constrict blood flow to the brain.When used on a dog that may be reacting out of fear, they make the world more scary by adding pain on top of an already frightening situation.Never work with a trainer that uses “balanced” techniques or claims they can “fix” your dog within a short period of time.If you need support or tips about how to best train your puppy or dog to walk on leash, consult a professional for help. .

Leave a Reply

Your email adress will not be published ,Requied fileds are marked*.