Deer Blood Tracking Dog Training
Tracking

Deer Blood Tracking Dog Training

  • October 1, 2021

If you draw a line along the western borders of Idaho, Utah, and New Mexico, you’re looking at the demarcation for legal use of dogs to aid in game recovery efforts.This means that throughout much of the whitetail’s range, if you shank a shot and hit a buck in the guts, you can look up a local tracker to help you out.This, according to Jeremy Moore, a member of United Blood Trackers and an accomplished dog trainer, isn’t as hard as most people think.Eventually, Moore will use a scent he produces through his Dog Bone company to create “trails” with tennis balls that increase the difficulty of the track and offer the reward of a retrieve.While Moore does recommend some of those simple training drills for encouraging nose-work, it’s the on-the-job experience that really helps dogs understand what’s being asked of them.This reinforcement, like the first few times a bird dog sets off in the CRP for roosters or along a big-timber logging road for ruffs, is crucial to making the whole thing click.Heap on the praise, make it a big deal, and allow the essence of their job to congeal in their brains.Just like with upland or waterfowl hunting, early, positive experiences breed success throughout a dog’s entire life.That way, when the inevitable poor shot happens from me or someone in my deer hunting circle, we’ll have a hell of a lot better chance of a grip-and-grin photo at the end of the day. .

Blood Dog Training

Trainers that will have you believe that you need to maintain a supply of blood or special boots in order to train your dog are very misguided.When your dog is brought to the spot where blood appears, he is directed to locate that particular animal.He is following the scent (dried skin cells) trail left behind by the animal, and not just its blood droppings.If you can identify the location where the deer was standing when it was shot, the dog will track that particular animal, even if there is not visible blood.When training a dog, if blood collected from one animal is being sprayed, and a piece of hide from a different animal is being used as the drag, it can and usually does, confuse the dog, making training a monumental task.Simply use portions of the cape of a particular animal as the drag and teach the dog to track that particular scent.One evening I received a call from them that one of the hunters in their group left his stand and became lost. .

How to Train Your Dog to Track Wounded Deer

How to Train Your Dog to Track Wounded Deer

How to Train Your Dog to Track Wounded Deer

Some states let you continue tracking after dark and there are those who have a specific manner in which you can finish the kill when you catch up with the wounded animal. .

Dog Training – Deer Search, Inc.

When the pup likes to track and has some powers of concentration, she may be introduced to longer and older lines, laid out with drops of deer blood from a squeeze bottle.Start with easy lines aged from two to four hours.Concentrate on motivating the dog with praise and positive reinforcement.Before a dog becomes useful for finding wounded deer he must be able to maintain concentration on the old wounded deer scent line even when confronted by a healthy deer or a hot line.The more the dog is motivated to please you the easier training will be.The dog that can follow a blood line laid with ½ pint of blood and aged 20 to 24 hours should be capable of finding many wounded deer that cannot be tracked by eye.Letting the dog “find” easy, dead deer that have been successfully eye-tracked by hunters is another way to train dogs or to reinforce the training with artificial bloodlines. .

Training your Dog to Track a Wounded Deer

Training your Dog to Track a Wounded Deer

Training your Dog to Track a Wounded Deer

Training your Dog to Track a Wounded Deer.Tracking a Wounded Deer.Let’s go over a few ways to train your dog for wounded deer tracking:.All you need to get started is a container of deer blood, a deer hide, and a little piece of deer like a tail or an ear (as a treat at the end of the trail), all from the same animal.Start training early, if possible.Start working on location.This trail should start small and can grow as you see fit – depending on your dog’s aptitude.A great way to reinforce your dog’s training is to bring in a more experienced dog to help train your pup!**After a while, have a friend go with you and have them mark the trail in the same way, so you can be sure the dog is following the deer’s scent and not your own. .

Blood trail dogs will aid in locating downed deer in W.Va.

Blood trail dogs will aid in locating downed deer in W.Va.

Blood trail dogs will aid in locating downed deer in W.Va.

Miller is one of those who is taking full advantage of the state’s freshly minted law which allows for the use of blood tracking dogs to help find downed deer.Every dog used to track a deer in West Virginia must be leashed at all times.“We use a long leash, about 30 feet, that way it gives the dog some leeway to work, but you’re still in control.The law says you have to be in control of the dog,” Miller explained.“The blood is still there.The breed he said is often used in Texas and in the swamps of Arkansas and Louisiana to track down deer in places where no leash is required.Miller explained training, like any other dog for any other purpose, requires repetition and reward. .

Top 5 Traits of a Blood Trailing Dog

Top 5 Traits of a Blood Trailing Dog

Top 5 Traits of a Blood Trailing Dog

Culbertson is head guide at Tara Wildlife, a “bow only” hunting operation, near Vicksburg, Mississippi.Before that group goes to the stand each hunter attends an orientation on safety, regulations, what to shoot and what to do after the shot,” said Culbertson.Once a dog reaches 4-5 years of age he stops making those silly mistakes.“Labs are eager to please, easy to train, have excellent noses and thrive in water.According to Culbertson, the following are traits needed by a good blood trailing dog.That me-first attitude translates into a dog with confidence and self-reliance needed to find a wounded deer.Once the pup bonds with you it will be eager to please, making training an easier job.Drive is what makes the dog finish a track no matter how long or difficult.By the end of season our dogs have lost 20% of their body weight, have no hair on their nose and around their eyes and are just plain tired.Culbertson drove me to a hang-on stand located on the edge of a large, backwater slough.Just before dark a mature 8 pointer swam the slough to the ridge where I was perched.When he was 30 yards from my stand I put an arrow just behind his shoulder and watched him bound out of sight. .

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