Deer Tracking Dog Training Books
Tracking

Deer Tracking Dog Training Books

  • October 4, 2021

And that is what this book is all about, getting you started on training a dog that can cut your deer tracking time in half and increase your recovery rate by 80 or 90 percent.You could use a strip of bacon or a piece of calf liver tied to a string as your first scent marker.As your dog become more adept at following the trail, you should start to make it more difficult by hopping the calf liver or bacon strip along the ground and lifting it for several feet between touches.But knowing how to get the dog motivated to track and stay with the right line from the beginning really pays off when working with hunters to recover their harvest. .

New version of John Jeanneney's book ...

New version of John Jeanneney's book ...

New version of John Jeanneney's book ...

The book can be purchased on our website ( CLICK HERE ) for $39.95 plus $4.00 for shipment within the United States.Just today we received feedback from Marianne Jacobs who lives in Luxembourg, and has a lot of experience in hunting and blood tracking. .

How to Train Your Dog to Track Wounded Deer

How to Train Your Dog to Track Wounded Deer

How to Train Your Dog to Track Wounded Deer

The task is simple, you are training your dog to track a wounded deer, presumably one that you failed to kill with the first shot. .

Blood Dog Training

Trainers that will have you believe that you need to maintain a supply of blood or special boots in order to train your dog are very misguided.When your dog is brought to the spot where blood appears, he is directed to locate that particular animal.He is following the scent (dried skin cells) trail left behind by the animal, and not just its blood droppings.If you can identify the location where the deer was standing when it was shot, the dog will track that particular animal, even if there is not visible blood.When training a dog, if blood collected from one animal is being sprayed, and a piece of hide from a different animal is being used as the drag, it can and usually does, confuse the dog, making training a monumental task.Simply use portions of the cape of a particular animal as the drag and teach the dog to track that particular scent.One evening I received a call from them that one of the hunters in their group left his stand and became lost. .

Leashed Tracking Dog License

Leashed Tracking Dog License

Leashed Tracking Dog License

Leashed Tracking Dog License.The license fee is $50.What This License Allows.What This License Does Not Allow.Tracking without notifying an Environmental Conservation Officer of the location and hunter information, if applicable.Pursuing and taking big game with aid from certified tracking dog.Complete and submit the Leashed Tracking Dog License Application (an application and instructions will be sent by mail after passing the exam).You will receive a registration confirmation once complete along with additional information on taking the exam.No fee Exam Study Materials: New York State Leashed Tracking Dog Study Guide (PDF).At the end of the examination, upon successful completion with a grade of 80% or greater, you will be provided with a license application form and further instructions on how to apply for the license.DEC also issues the following licenses for permitting the use of tracking or hunting dogs on wildlife or game:. .

Shed Hunting Dog Training

Shed Hunting Dog Training

Shed Hunting Dog Training

Often times it requires the right conditions, a good number of friends or family members, and a considerable amount of leg work to find any at all.In addition to all of these considerations, price, temperament, and space requirement should all be taken into account when narrowing down your antler dog breed options.The simple fact is that if they have a good nose and a desire to please, they will make a great shed hunting dog.So, if you already have a dog you are considering training to find shed antlers and they possess these qualities, you’re in luck!The secret is baby steps… Don’t just hide a shed antler in the woods one day expect your untrained dog to seek it out and deliver it you when you give a command.Before long they’ll know exactly what is expected and your shed hunting dog training exercises will have been a success!As your dog progresses and becomes more focused with age and practice, you can start to work them into environments with more distractions.For shed hunting dog breeds, the instinct is already there, but it’s up to you to bring it out of them by making it fun for them!For those breeds that aren’t naturally as inclined to retrieve, it’s ok to entice them with a small piece of food.Remember, a dog is soft and sensitive and making them retrieve something hard and pointy comes with a risk.Once your dog has the retrieving part down pat, it’s time to introduce the shape and smell of an antler.There are several products online for this purpose and are an essential tool for transitioning your dog into retrieving hard antlers.Starting back in a controlled environment like the house, have your dog sit… Either toss or walk out and set the antler dummy where it is just out of sight for them and give them the command.Over time, make the hiding places more difficult and move outdoors once they understand what is expected of them.For this reason, it’s a good idea to start in high probability areas… These include winter food sources, S/SE facing slopes, and thermal cover where bucks are likely to shed their antlers.Work the downwind side of whatever terrain feature your shed hunting and he’ll likely pick up the scent long before he ever finds the antler.There was a lot of information covered in this piece but there are a few important things to keep in mind that will make or break your shed dog training success…. .

How to Train Your Dog to Blood Trail Deer

How to Train Your Dog to Blood Trail Deer

How to Train Your Dog to Blood Trail Deer

If you draw a line along the western borders of Idaho, Utah, and New Mexico, you’re looking at the demarcation for legal use of dogs to aid in game recovery efforts.This means that throughout much of the whitetail’s range, if you shank a shot and hit a buck in the guts, you can look up a local tracker to help you out.This, according to Jeremy Moore, a member of United Blood Trackers and an accomplished dog trainer, isn’t as hard as most people think.Eventually, Moore will use a scent he produces through his Dog Bone company to create “trails” with tennis balls that increase the difficulty of the track and offer the reward of a retrieve.While Moore does recommend some of those simple training drills for encouraging nose-work, it’s the on-the-job experience that really helps dogs understand what’s being asked of them.This reinforcement, like the first few times a bird dog sets off in the CRP for roosters or along a big-timber logging road for ruffs, is crucial to making the whole thing click.Heap on the praise, make it a big deal, and allow the essence of their job to congeal in their brains.Just like with upland or waterfowl hunting, early, positive experiences breed success throughout a dog’s entire life.That way, when the inevitable poor shot happens from me or someone in my deer hunting circle, we’ll have a hell of a lot better chance of a grip-and-grin photo at the end of the day. .

John Jeanneney, leashed tracking dog pioneer, dies

John Jeanneney, leashed tracking dog pioneer, dies

John Jeanneney, leashed tracking dog pioneer, dies

In 1975, the state Department of Environmental Conservation issued the first Experimental Scientific Collectors License to Jeanneney, sanctioning the experiment of using leashed tracking dogs to track wounded big game, thus laying the groundwork for the launching of Deer Search, Inc. Jeanneney was co-founder of the organization, along with the late Don Hickman, of Pleasant Valley, and Hans Klein, also of Pleasant Valley.A longtime resident of Clinton Corners, Jeanneney moved to Berne, Albany County in 1999, after his retirement from Hofstra.Jeanneney’s success with the scientific collector’s license so impressed the DEC that in 1978 the agency issued a limited number of research permits that resulted in the formation of Deer Search, the first successful volunteer leashed tracking dog program in North America.After intense lobbying of the state legislature a bill was passed and signed into law on July 2, 1986, creating Section 11-0928 of the state Environmental Conservation Law, which authorizes the DEC to license handlers to use leashed tracking dogs on essentially the same basis as during the experiment.As Klein said, “Jeanneney was the brains behind the effort to sell the DEC on the concept here in New York.” More than 40 states now allow the use of such dogs for recovering wounded big game.Leashed tracking dog handlers provide a valuable service in aiding hunters in locating wounded big game that otherwise may go unrecovered.Each must have a Certificate of Completion of Hunter Education Training from DEC and must have a valid New York State Hunting License.

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