Training A Deer Tracking Dog
Tracking

Training A Deer Tracking Dog

  • October 9, 2021

The task is simple, you are training your dog to track a wounded deer, presumably one that you failed to kill with the first shot. .

How to Train Your Dog to Blood Trail Deer

How to Train Your Dog to Blood Trail Deer

How to Train Your Dog to Blood Trail Deer

If you draw a line along the western borders of Idaho, Utah, and New Mexico, you’re looking at the demarcation for legal use of dogs to aid in game recovery efforts.This means that throughout much of the whitetail’s range, if you shank a shot and hit a buck in the guts, you can look up a local tracker to help you out.This, according to Jeremy Moore, a member of United Blood Trackers and an accomplished dog trainer, isn’t as hard as most people think.Eventually, Moore will use a scent he produces through his Dog Bone company to create “trails” with tennis balls that increase the difficulty of the track and offer the reward of a retrieve.While Moore does recommend some of those simple training drills for encouraging nose-work, it’s the on-the-job experience that really helps dogs understand what’s being asked of them.This reinforcement, like the first few times a bird dog sets off in the CRP for roosters or along a big-timber logging road for ruffs, is crucial to making the whole thing click.Heap on the praise, make it a big deal, and allow the essence of their job to congeal in their brains.Just like with upland or waterfowl hunting, early, positive experiences breed success throughout a dog’s entire life.That way, when the inevitable poor shot happens from me or someone in my deer hunting circle, we’ll have a hell of a lot better chance of a grip-and-grin photo at the end of the day. .

Training your Dog to Track a Wounded Deer

Training your Dog to Track a Wounded Deer

Training your Dog to Track a Wounded Deer

That’s why many hunters use dogs to track the animal after they’ve done the front work.and given the right training and proper motivation, can even track a wounded deer the next day.Let’s go over a few ways to train your dog for wounded deer tracking:.Go out to the woods or wherever you plan to hunt, and while you are out of the dog’s sight, use the container of blood to dribble a trail about 100-200 yards long, leading to the piece of deer so the dog can understand they found what they are looking for!This trail should start small and can grow as you see fit – depending on your dog’s aptitude.Use that piece of hide with only one or two drops on it and sparsely mark trees and blades of grass to exercise your canine’s nose more.**After a while, have a friend go with you and have them mark the trail in the same way, so you can be sure the dog is following the deer’s scent and not your own.An important thing to keep in mind here too: every area has its own laws for use of tracking dogs.If you were able to locate your prize, give us a call today to talk about preserving your trophy! .

Blood Dog Training

Simply put, everyone and every animal have a distinct odor which can be identified via smell.When the blood from a wounded animal drips from the skin of that animal, its scent is absorbed within the blood.If trained properly, he will only track the animal whose scent he smells.If you can identify the location where the deer was standing when it was shot, the dog will track that particular animal, even if there is not visible blood.When training a dog, if blood collected from one animal is being sprayed, and a piece of hide from a different animal is being used as the drag, it can and usually does, confuse the dog, making training a monumental task.For example: I trained a dog for a friend to find wounded deer, and the dog worked fantastically.For more information on dog training, visit Training. .

Deer Tracking Dog: Everything You Need To Know

Deer Tracking Dog: Everything You Need To Know

Deer Tracking Dog: Everything You Need To Know

There are a ton of different advantages that a dog that tracks deer brings to the deer hunter.The even better news: you can train your dog to track deer, no matter the breed or age. .

Dog Training – Deer Search, Inc.

When the pup likes to track and has some powers of concentration, she may be introduced to longer and older lines, laid out with drops of deer blood from a squeeze bottle.Start with easy lines aged from two to four hours.Concentrate on motivating the dog with praise and positive reinforcement.Before a dog becomes useful for finding wounded deer he must be able to maintain concentration on the old wounded deer scent line even when confronted by a healthy deer or a hot line.The more the dog is motivated to please you the easier training will be.The dog that can follow a blood line laid with ½ pint of blood and aged 20 to 24 hours should be capable of finding many wounded deer that cannot be tracked by eye.Letting the dog “find” easy, dead deer that have been successfully eye-tracked by hunters is another way to train dogs or to reinforce the training with artificial bloodlines. .

Do We Really Need to Train a Dog to Track Deer?

Do We Really Need to Train a Dog to Track Deer?

Do We Really Need to Train a Dog to Track Deer?

“So, how can I train my dog to track a dead deer?” This is probably one of the most often asked questions I hear these days, particularly as fall approaches and deer season is underway.If you’re a dog owner and have aspirations of using them for game recovery, there’s no better time to begin training them to recover deer.So back to that often asked question, “How can I train my dog to track”?I really don’t train any of the dogs I work with to track, no different than I really don’t train retrievers to make retrieves.Let me first say I do not mean to minimize the level of work and commitment that goes into developing a great game recovery dog.Although I am not great, I really enjoy the game of golf and will get out of it what I put into it.Training a tracking dog can be seen in the same light.If you put some time into training and are able to use your dog to help recover a handful of deer this year or even one that may have otherwise not been, there’s your hole in one and it definitely still counts! .

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